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Wandering jew poisonous to cats

Wandering jew poisonous to cats


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Wandering jew poisonous to cats

SUMMARY:

The wandering jew is a parasitic wasp which lays eggs on other wasps, then they are carried by the wind to a new nest where the larvae develop, kill the female and lay more eggs to reproduce. They can also enter new nests without being carried by the wind. Some queens kill other queens and their offspring before taking over the new nest.

Wandering Jew larvae and adults cause cat owners grief with the risk of fatal encephalitis in newborn kittens. Wandering Jew venom and wasp stings cause pnful, sometimes life-threatening, swelling, and severe allergic reactions in humans. In the United States, the venom of this wasp is classified as a Category II biological agent, and in New York State, the wandering jew was classified as a Category IIIA biological agent.

The wandering jew is a parasitoid wasp. The most common of the wasps, the larvae of the wandering jew are parasitic wasps, which lay their eggs on other wasps. The larvae hatch in the abdomen of the adult wasp. They emerge through a hole and remn within the abdomen of the adult. After the adult dies, the larvae leave the wasp’s body. The larvae then leave and find a new host. Sometimes, they enter a new host’s body when they’re still eggs or larvae. The larvae of the wandering jew cause the death of their host by ingesting some of its fluids and the larvae pupate in a cocoon-like structure. The wasp uses the adult body as a base for its new colony.

DESCRIPTION:

The wandering jew is a parasitic wasp which lays eggs on other wasps, then they are carried by the wind to a new nest where the larvae develop, kill the female and lay more eggs to reproduce. They can also enter new nests without being carried by the wind. Some queens kill other queens and their offspring before taking over the new nest.

Wandering Jew larvae and adults cause cat owners grief with the risk of fatal encephalitis in newborn kittens. Wandering Jew venom and wasp stings cause pnful, sometimes life-threatening, swelling, and severe allergic reactions in humans. In the United States, the venom of this wasp is classified as a Category II biological agent, and in New York State, the wandering jew was classified as a Category IIIA biological agent.

Wandering Jew (Philanthus triangulum) larva: A female wandering jew larva.

Adult wandering jew: This is an adult wandering jew.

CARE AND BEHAVIOR:

HISTORY:

The wandering jew was first described in 1775 by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturae, which was translated into English in 1789. The insect was named for its characteristic behavior of wandering from its home, wandering jew (Philanthus triangulum).

The first person to discover the adult wandering jew was William Saunders of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first recorded case of wandering jews in the United States was in 1837, when Saunders had to move a hive of wasps from a porch to the ground as they had become an annoyance.

The first recorded death in the United States was in 1841 when Thomas McKean’s cat was killed by a wandering jew while on the porch of the McKean home in Philadelphia. McKean had to kill the cat with a knife as the wasps had become too strong to be handled. McKean had another cat killed by the wandering jew in 1848.

THE ANIMAL:

SYSTEMATIC:

The wandering jew was placed in the superfamily Ichneumonidae, which belongs to the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). The family Philanthinae is the only subfamily of this family, which is the only family of ichneumonids.

Wandering Jew larva:

Wandering Jew (Philanthus triangulum) pupa:

REPRODUCTION:

LIFE CYCLE:

The wandering jew lays its eggs on other wasps which the larvae will then develop into adults. The wandering jew larva then lays eggs to develop into wandering jews.

Nesting period:

May through August in most parts of the U.S. except in the Northeast.

Wandering jew female: The wandering jew is a female wasp.

Wandering jew female laying eggs:

Lifespan:

The female wandering jew’s lifespan is one to two weeks.

POPULATION:

Wandering jews are found in almost all areas of the United States except in the Rocky Mountns, Great Plns and in the northeast. Wandering jews were first seen in the Northeast in 1922 in a home in Queens, New York.

In 1927, the first documented case of a wandering jew was in the South. In 1933, wandering jews were reported in the Midwest.

Wandering jews were first documented in California in 1945.

In 1947, an estimated 2,500 were found in the New York City area.

In 1947, more than 100 were reported in Michigan, including in Dearborn, where there was a great influx of refugees from Europe.

Wandering jews were first documented in the Northeast in 1963 and in New York City in 1969.

There was a report of wandering jews in San Diego in 1971.

In 1974, they were reported in Massachusetts.

In 1976, the first report of wandering jews in the Southwest was in Arizona.

The first record of an outbreak in Texas was in 1977.

An outbreak of wandering jews was reported in New Jersey in 1978.

In 1979, a report of an outbreak of wandering jews in New York City was made.

Wandering jews were first documented in the Midwest in 1980.

Wandering jews were first documented in California in 1981.

Wandering jews were first documented in the South in 1983.

In 1984, an outbreak of wandering jews in Arizona was reported.

In 1984, more than 100 were reported in Massachusetts.

The


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