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Vitamin c for dogs

Vitamin c for dogs


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Vitamin c for dogs with high cholesterol?

Is this really the best way to treat your dog with high cholesterol, vitamin c or both? I heard this was a really good way to treat it, but there are so many bad things about it. What do you guys think?

I'm hoping for the best, but I'm getting a bit worried about it.

I've always been told that your dog's cholesterol levels are very individual and therefore you should never try and force it, or you'll end up in big trouble.

My dog was diagnosed with high cholesterol after he was hit by a car, his vets recommended I put him on 'cholesterol' pills, along with Vitamin C. The first 3 months, his levels went down quite considerably. I would say about 15%, but he's still way higher than the 'normal' number. I've read up on the benefits of Vitamin C, and it's said that it helps clear your dog's blood, as well as increase red blood cell count.

The next 3 months, my dog's levels haven't gone down and are still way higher than 'normal'. I've noticed the 'cholesterol' pill has made his skin start to get worse and has started to lose some hair. My vet is telling me that the vitamin c isn't working, but that the cholesterol is'skewing' his results and that he needs to change to a different drug. This drug would be 'Doxycycline', but I've read that it could have many side effects, such as, bleeding gums, diarrhoea, loose stools, abdominal pain, and even possible death. The other side of the story, is that he's not getting any better, and I don't think I want to take the chance of making him worse.

I've been told that it's up to the owners to look out for their own dog's welfare and to make the best decision for them. In this case, it's my decision, and the vet has tried his best to get me to change my dogs medication, but I'm not budging.

Has anyone else ever tried the 'vitamin C' route for a dog with high cholesterol? I've tried looking online but haven't been able to find any real information on this, as it seems to be a very controversial subject.

I am not a vet, but am a licensed veterinary assistant in a state that requires that I have a certificate of animal first aid training. I do not know anything about high cholesterol in dogs, but the same principle would apply for humans.

When taking a blood sample for the lab to measure cholesterol levels, it is essential that you know the dog's baseline before the blood is taken. The lab technician will not take the reading, and you need to make sure that you know what the dog's normal level is, so that the numbers will match up.

If the numbers are all over the place, your dog may be a candidate for a different drug to help. Some medications will not help all dogs, and the one that is chosen will depend on how the dog's body is working. It could be that your dog's body is working fine, but that the medication is not working for the dog.

I hope this helps you make the best decision for your dog.

Pamela

The most difficult part about being a pet owner is learning to live with the people that you cannot control.

I've never had a dog with high cholesterol before and the information in this post makes me think that it might not be the best idea. It makes sense in theory to use the vitamin c to clear your dogs blood, but the long term effects might not be as good.

I've also heard that it can be dangerous for your dog to take high amounts of vitamin c, and I've read that if you're giving it to them in tablet form, that they can have problems swallowing. I don't really know how I'd deal with it if my dog was having trouble eating their food, but I guess it's better than them dying.

Does anyone have any advice on this? Should I even be thinking about it? Should I try it, and then find something else to treat it with? Is there anyone else out there that has been through this situation before, that could offer me some advice?

I am not a vet, but am a licensed veterinary assistant in a state that requires that I have a certificate of animal first aid training. I do not know anything about high cholesterol in dogs, but the same principle would apply for humans.

When taking a blood sample for the lab to measure cholesterol levels, it is essential that you know the dog's baseline before the blood is taken. The lab technician will not take the reading, and you need to make sure that you know what the dog's normal level is, so that the numbers will match up.

If the numbers are all over the place, your dog may be a candidate for a different drug to help. Some medications will not help all dogs, and the one that is chosen will depend on how the dog's body is working. It could be that your dog's body is working fine, but that the medication is not working for the dog.

I hope this helps you make the best decision for your dog.

Pamela

Hi Pamela,

Thank you for the kind response, I really appreciate it.

The problem is that there is no normal range for cholesterol in dogs, because it fluctuates so much for each dog. This is


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